Aquaculture Technology Work or Business Option Degree

Aquaculture is defined simply as the farming and husbandry of aquatic organisms. In practice aquaculture or mariculture (saltwater aquaculture) involves commercially growing seafood for consumers. It also involves the sciences of natural resource management and enhancement, collection methods, aquarium technology, facility construction and maintenance, and biotechnology production from marine organisms.

Carteret Community College offers the Aquaculture Technology program and emphasizes applied marine sciences and mariculture. Lecture courses are offered in the traditional classroom or as online courses, which use the Blackboard (an Internet portal with rich media content to enhance comprehension). The focus of the program is on salt-water species like oysters, clams, soft-shell crabs, and marine fin fish like flounder, drum and bait minnows but some freshwater aquaculture species are also covered.

Students learn hands-on skills through the Aquaculture Practicum series. Skills such as water quality testing, system construction and maintenance, species collection methods and treatments, feeding and breeding technology are part of the practicums. Students also work with program partners in the industry in practicums and in the cooperative work experience course. Partners include university and government marine sciences laboratories, fishery management agencies, public aquariums, environmental non-governmental organizations, as well as commercial aquatic businesses. The CCC facility is a 5,000 square ft. state-of-the-art showcase for applied marine science, aquatic hatchery and marine biotechnology work.

Graduates of the program may find employment on private farms and government hatcheries or at public aquariums. They may also start new businesses in fish, shellfish, or aquatic plant farming, aquatic management services, home/office aquarium or water gardening services.

Graduates with the AAS in Aquaculture Technology from CCC can pursue Bachelor’s degrees through 2+2 articulations with UNCW and ECU.

Program Learning Outcomes

P1: Nitrification Cycle
Nitrification and re circulation aquaculture systems: Students will demonstrate knowledge of “nitrification cycle” by performing analysis of nitrification cycle for a re circulation system and present results graphically.

P2: Troubleshooting
Practical troubleshooting and problem solving: Students will demonstrate ability to convert actual aquaculture problems to a series of mathematical calculations and compared with actual values.

P3: Water Quality Analysis
Proficiency in Water Quality Analysis: Students will demonstrate ability to test and analyze water samples. Water quality parameters must be tested using a variety of methods and equipment. Potential uses for and evaluation of the water will be addressed.

Program Contact

David Cerino
Chair, Aquaculture Technology
Howard Building
Phone: (252) 222-6114
Email: cerinod@carteret.edu

First Semester

College Transfer Success Click for details
ACA 122
1.00
College Transfer Success Close
ACA
122

This course provides information and strategies necessary to develop clear academic and professional goals beyond the community college experience. Topics include the CAA, college policies and culture, career exploration, gathering information on senior institutions, strategic planning, critical thinking, and communications skills for a successful academic transition. Upon completion, students should be able to develop an academic plan to transition successfully to senior institutions.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Aquaculture I Click for details
AQU 111
3.00
Aquaculture I Close
AQU
111

This course introduces the basic principles of fish and shellfish production. Topics include site selection; water quality; nutrition and feeding; management of diseases and parasites; genetics and breeding; and harvest, transport and marketing. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the natural conditions and management practices necessary to produce a crop of fish or shellfish.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Aquaculture Practicum I Click for details
AQU 161
1.00
Aquaculture Practicum I Close
AQU
161

This course provides students with practical hands-on experience in fish/shellfish farming. Emphasis is placed on introductory concepts involved in daily management. Upon completion, students should be able to perform routine duties associated with the daily management of a fish/shellfish production facility

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

General Biology I Click for details
BIO 111
4.00
General Biology I Close
BIO
111

This course introduces the principles and concepts of biology. Emphasis is placed on basic biological chemistry, molecular and cellular biology, metabolism and energy transformation, genetics, evolution, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate understanding of life at the molecular and cellular levels.

Credits: 4.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Writing and Inquiry Click for details
ENG 111
3.00
Writing and Inquiry Close
ENG
111

This course is designed to develop the ability to produce clear writing in a variety of genres and formats using a recursive process. Emphasis includes inquiry, analysis, effective use of rhetorical strategies, thesis development, audience awareness, and revision. Upon completion, students should be able to produce unified, coherent, well-developed essays using standard written English.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Quantitative Literacy Click for details
MAT 143
3.00
Quantitative Literacy Close
MAT
143

This course is designed to engage students in complex and realistic situations involving the mathematical phenomena of quantity, change and relationship, and uncertainty through project- and activity-based assessment. Emphasis is placed on authentic contexts which will introduce the concepts of numeracy, proportional reasoning, dimensional analysis, rates of growth, personal finance, consumer statistics, practical probabilities, and mathematics for citizenship. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize quantitative information as consumers and to make personal, professional, and civic decisions by decoding, interpreting, using, and communicating quantitative information found in modern media and encountered in everyday life.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

15 Total Credits

Second Semester

Aquaculture II Click for details
AQU 112
3.00
Aquaculture II Close
AQU
112

This course covers the specific culture techniques used in the production of a variety of aquatic species. Emphasis is placed on species of economic importance in North Carolina, especially channel catfish, hybrid striped bass, rainbow trout, crawfish, clams, and oysters. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the various culture methods and prepare a production plan for each of the species covered.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Aquaculture Practicum II Click for details
AQU 162
1.00
Aquaculture Practicum II Close
AQU
162

This course is designed to provide students with basic hands-on experience in fish/shellfish production. Emphasis is placed on the specialized culture techniques used to produce a variety of species of fish/shellfish. Upon completion, students should be able to complete the various tasks associated with the production of various species of fish/shellfish.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

General Biology II Click for details
BIO 112
4.00
General Biology II Close
BIO
112

This course is a continuation of BIO 111. Emphasis is placed on organisms, evolution, biodiversity, plant and animal systems, ecology, and other related topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate comprehension of life at the organismal and ecological levels.

Credits: 4.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

ENG 114
3.00
Professional Research & Reporting Close
ENG
114

This course, the second in a series of two, is designed to teach professional communication skills. Emphasis is placed on research, listening, critical reading and thinking, analysis, interpretation, and design used in oral and written presentations. Upon completion, students should be able to work individually and collaboratively to produce well-designed business and professional written and oral presentations.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

General Chemistry I Click for details
CHM 151
4.00
General Chemistry I Close
CHM
151

This course covers fundamental principles and laws of chemistry. Topics include measurement, atomic and molecular structure, periodicity, chemical reactions, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, gas laws, and solutions. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental chemical laws and concepts as needed in CHM 152.

Credits: 4.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

or

Introduction to Chemistry Click for details
CHM 131
3.00
Introduction to Chemistry Close
CHM
131

This course introduces the fundamental concepts of inorganic chemistry. Topics include measurement, matter and energy, atomic and molecular structure, nuclear chemistry, stoichiometry, chemical formulas and reactions, chemical bonding, gas laws, solutions, and acids and bases. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of chemistry as it applies to other fields.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites: CHM-131A

Introduction to Chemistry Lab Click for details
CHM 131A
1.00
Introduction to Chemistry Lab Close
CHM
131A

This course is a laboratory to accompany CHM 131. Emphasis is placed on laboratory experiences that enhance materials presented in CHM 131. Upon completion, students should be able to utilize basic laboratory procedures and apply them to chemical principles presented in CHM 131.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

15 Total Credits

Third Semester

Aquaculture Practicum III Click for details
AQU 163
1.00
Aquaculture Practicum III Close
AQU
163

This course is designed to provide students with basic hands-on experience in fish/shellfish production. Emphasis is placed on the special problems associated with fish/shellfish production during the critical warm summer season. Upon completion, students should be able to address the various problems associated with warm season fish/shellfish production.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Aquaculture Facilities Click for details
AQU 220
3.00
Aquaculture Facilities Close
AQU
220

This course covers the design of facilities used in the production of fish and shellfish. Topics include pond construction, open-channel and pipe flows, motors and pumps, water wells, cage and raft construction, and flow-through and recirculating system design. Upon completion, students should be able to design a variety of aquaculture production systems.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Humanities/Fine Arts Electives (Select One)

Art Appreciation Click for details
ART 111
3.00
Art Appreciation Close
ART
111

This course introduces the origins and historical development of art. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of design principles to various art forms including but not limited to sculpture, painting, and architecture. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and analyze a variety of artistic styles, periods, and media.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Art History Survey I Click for details
ART 114
3.00
Art History Survey I Close
ART
114

This course covers the development of art forms from ancient times to the Renaissance. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Art History Survey II Click for details
ART 115
3.00
Art History Survey II Close
ART
115

This course covers the development of art forms from the Renaissance to the present. Emphasis is placed on content, terminology, design, and style. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an historical understanding of art as a product reflective of human social development.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

American Literature I Click for details
ENG 231
3.00
American Literature I Close
ENG
231

This course covers selected works in American literature from its beginnings to 1865. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

American Literature II Click for details
ENG 232
3.00
American Literature II Close
ENG
232

This course covers selected works in American literature from 1865 to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze and interpret literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

British Literature I Click for details
ENG 241
3.00
British Literature I Close
ENG
241

This course covers selected works in British literature from its beginnings to the Romantic Period. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

British Literature II Click for details
ENG 242
3.00
British Literature II Close
ENG
242

This course covers selected works in British literature from the Romantic Period to the present. Emphasis is placed on historical background, cultural context, and literary analysis of selected prose, poetry, and drama. Upon completion, students should be able to interpret, analyze, and respond to literary works in their historical and cultural contexts.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Critical Thinking Click for details
HUM 115
3.00
Critical Thinking Close
HUM
115

This course introduces the use of critical thinking skills in the context of human conflict. Emphasis is placed on evaluating information, problem solving, approaching cross-cultural perspectives, and resolving controversies and dilemmas. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate orally and in writing the use of critical thinking skills in the analysis of appropriate texts.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Music Appreciation Click for details
MUS 110
3.00
Music Appreciation Close
MUS
110

This course is a basic survey of the music of the Western world. Emphasis is placed on the elements of music, terminology, composers, form, and style within a historical perspective. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in basic listening and understanding of the art of music.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Introduction to Jazz Click for details
MUS 112
3.00
Introduction to Jazz Close
MUS
112

This course introduces the origins and musical components of jazz and the contributions of its major artists. Emphasis is placed on the development of discriminating listening habits, as well as the investigation of the styles and structural forms of the jazz idiom. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate skills in listening and understanding this form of American music.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Introduction to Logic Click for details
PHI 230
3.00
Introduction to Logic Close
PHI
230

This course introduces basic concepts and techniques for distinguishing between good and bad reasoning. Emphasis is placed on deduction, induction, validity, soundness, syllogisms, truth functions, predicate logic, analogical inference, common fallacies, and scientific methods. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze arguments, distinguish between deductive and inductive arguments, test validity, and appraise inductive reasoning.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Introduction to Ethics Click for details
PHI 240
3.00
Introduction to Ethics Close
PHI
240

This course introduces theories about the nature and foundations of moral judgments and applications to contemporary moral issues. Emphasis is placed on moral theories such as consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. Upon completion, students should be able to apply various ethical theories to moral issues such as abortion, capital punishment, poverty, war, terrorism, the treatment of animals, and issues arising from new technologies.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Social/Behavioral Science Electives (Select One)

Principles of Microeconomics Click for details
ECO 251
3.00
Principles of Microeconomics Close
ECO
251

This course introduces economic analysis of individual, business, and industry in the market economy. Topics include the price mechanism, supply and demand, optimizing economic behavior, costs and revenue, market structures, factor markets, income distribution, market failure, and government intervention. Upon completion, students should be able to identify and evaluate consumer and business alternatives in order to efficiently achieve economic objectives.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Principles of Macroeconomics Click for details
ECO 252
3.00
Principles of Macroeconomics Close
ECO
252

This course introduces economic analysis of aggregate employment, income, and prices. Topics include major schools of economic thought; aggregate supply and demand; economic measures, fluctuations, and growth; money and banking; stabilization techniques; and international trade. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate national economic components, conditions, and alternatives for achieving socioeconomic goals.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

World Regional Geography Click for details
GEO 111
3.00
World Regional Geography Close
GEO
111

This course introduces the regional concept which emphasizes the spatial association of people and their environment. Emphasis is placed on the physical, cultural, and economic systems that interact to produce the distinct regions of the earth. Upon completion, students should be able to describe variations in physical and cultural features of a region and demonstrate an understanding of their functional relationships.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

World Civilizations I Click for details
HIS 111
3.00
World Civilizations I Close
HIS
111

This course introduces world history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern era. Topics include Eurasian, African, American, and Greco-Roman civilizations and Christian, Islamic and Byzantine cultures. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in pre-modern world civilizations.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

World Civilizations II Click for details
HIS 112
3.00
World Civilizations II Close
HIS
112

This course introduces world history from the early modern era to the present. Topics include the cultures of Africa, Europe, India, China, Japan, and the Americas. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in modern world civilizations.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

American History I Click for details
HIS 131
3.00
American History I Close
HIS
131

This course is a survey of American history from pre-history through the Civil War era. Topics include the migrations to the Americas, the colonial and revolutionary periods, the development of the Republic, and the Civil War. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in early American history.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

American History II Click for details
HIS 132
3.00
American History II Close
HIS
132

This course is a survey of American history from the Civil War era to the present. Topics include industrialization, immigration, the Great Depression, the major American wars, the Cold War, and social conflict. Upon completion, students should be able to analyze significant political, socioeconomic, and cultural developments in American history since the Civil War.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

American Government Click for details
POL 120
3.00
American Government Close
POL
120

This course is a study of the origins, development, structure, and functions of American government. Topics include the constitutional framework, federalism, the three branches of government including the bureaucracy, civil rights and liberties, political participation and behavior, and policy process. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the basic concepts and participatory processes of the American political system.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Interpersonal Psychology Click for details
PSY 118
3.00
Interpersonal Psychology Close
PSY
118

This course introduces the basic principles of psychology as they relate to personal and professional development. Emphasis is placed on personality traits, communication/leadership styles, effective problem solving, and cultural diversity as they apply to personal and work environments. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of these principles of psychology as they apply to personal and professional development.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

General Psychology Click for details
PSY 150
3.00
General Psychology Close
PSY
150

This course provides an overview of the scientific study of human behavior. Topics include history, methodology, biopsychology, sensation, perception, learning, motivation, cognition, abnormal behavior, personality theory, social psychology, and other relevant topics. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic knowledge of the science of psychology.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Introduction to Sociology Click for details
SOC 210
3.00
Introduction to Sociology Close
SOC
210

This course introduces the scientific study of human society, culture, and social interactions. Topics include socialization, research methods, diversity and inequality, cooperation and conflict, social change, social institutions, and organizations. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge of sociological concepts as they apply to the interplay among individuals, groups, and societies.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

10 Total Credits

Fourth Semester

Aquabusiness Click for details
AQU 120
3.00
Aquabusiness Close
AQU
120

This course provides a basic background in aquacultural economics, business management, and marketing. Emphasis is placed on the management of farms for profitable production and the sale of fish and shellfish products. Upon completion, students should be able to prepare a good quality farm/business plan for potential lenders and investors.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Aquaculture Practicum IV Click for details
AQU 164
1.00
Aquaculture Practicum IV Close
AQU
164

This course is designed to provide students with advanced hands-on experience in fish/shellfish production. Emphasis is placed on advanced topics in aquaculture, including nutrition, diseases, and genetics and breeding. Upon completion, students should be able to recognize nutritional and pathogenic diseases and should be proficient at selecting brood organisms.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Fish Nutrition & Diseases Click for details
AQU 240
3.00
Fish Nutrition & Diseases Close
AQU
240

This course introduces the principles of fish and shellfish nutrition and provides a background in the management of diseases and parasitic infestations. Topics include nutritional requirements of fish and shellfish, feed formulation, feeding practices, viral diseases, bacterial diseases, parasites, and medication and disease prevention. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the principles of nutrition and identify and control microbial and parasitic diseases of fish and shellfish.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Hatchery Management I Click for details
AQU 251
3.00
Hatchery Management I Close
AQU
251

This course introduces the basic principles of fish and shellfish hatchery management. Topics include the basic chemical, physical, and biological requirements for the propagation of a variety of commonly cultured fish, crustaceans, and mollusks. Upon completion, students should be able to describe the environment tolerances and preferences for reproduction of a variety of cultured species.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Microbiology Click for details
BIO 275
4.00
Microbiology Close
BIO
275

This course covers principles of microbiology and the impact these organisms have on man and the environment. Topics include the various groups of microorganisms, their structure, physiology, genetics, microbial pathogenicity, infectious diseases, immunology, and selected practical applications. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate knowledge and skills including microscopy, aseptic technique, staining, culture methods, and identification of microorganisms.

Credits: 4.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

14 Total Credits

Fifth Semester

Aquaculture Practicum V Click for details
AQU 165
1.00
Aquaculture Practicum V Close
AQU
165

This course is designed to provide students with advanced hands-on experience in fish/shellfish production. Emphasis is placed on facility design, construction and maintenance. Upon completion, students should be able to design, construct and maintain a variety of aquaculture production facilities.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Aquaculture Practicum VI Click for details
AQU 166
1.00
Aquaculture Practicum VI Close
AQU
166

This course is designed to provide students with advanced hands-on experience in fish/shellfish production. Emphasis is placed on water quality management in aquaculture. Upon completion, students should be proficient in the management of water quality in a variety of aquaculture production facilities.

Credits: 1.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Fish Genetics & Breeding Click for details
AQU 230
3.00
Fish Genetics & Breeding Close
AQU
230

This course covers the principles of qualitative and quantitative genetics and breeding of fish and shellfish. Emphasis is placed on quantitative genetic traits that affect various production parameters, with numerous examples using commonly cultured species. Upon completion, students should be able to discuss the basic principles of genetics and design appropriate breeding programs for a variety of commonly cultured species.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Hatchery Management II Click for details
AQU 252
3.00
Hatchery Management II Close
AQU
252

This course covers the specific techniques used in the artificial propagation of a variety of commonly cultured species of fish and shellfish. Topics include facility requirements, hatchery production planning, and propagation techniques for several species, including clams, shrimp, catfish, hybrid striped bass, rainbow trout, and others. Upon completion, students should be able to develop a plan for the successful operation of a fish or shellfish hatchery facility.

Credits: 3.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

Marine Biology Click for details
BIO 243
4.00
Marine Biology Close
BIO
243

This course covers the physical and biological components of the marine environment. Topics include major habitats, the diversity of organisms, their biology and ecology, marine productivity, and the use of marine resources by humans. Upon completion, students should be able to identify various marine habitats and organisms and to demonstrate a knowledge of their biology and ecology.

Credits: 4.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

12 Total Credits

Sixth Semester

Work-Based Learning I Click for details
WBL 112
2.00
Work-Based Learning I Close
WBL
112

This course provides a work-based learning experience with a college-approved employer in an area related to the student’s program of study. Emphasis is placed on integrating classroom learning with related work experience. Upon completion, students should be able to evaluate career selection, demonstrate employability skills, and satisfactorily perform work-related competencies.

Credits: 2.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

or

Aquaculture Project Click for details
AQU 280
2.00
Aquaculture Project Close
AQU
280

This course provides the student with an opportunity to complete an individualized project in the study of aquaculture, designed by the instructor. Emphasis is placed on the application of aquaculture principles to a topic of interest to the student. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate specialized knowledge of an advanced topic in aquaculture.

Credits: 2.00
Prerequisites:
Corequisites:

2 Total Credits