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Basic Skills – Adult Education

The Basic Skills department consists of four program areas including Adult Basic Education (ABE), Adult High School (AHS), English as a Second Language (ESL), and High School Equivalency (HSE). There are unique requirements for minor students (16 or 17 years old) and an orientation is required prior to enrollment in any of the Basic Skills programs. Please call the Basic Skills office at (252) 222-6195 for additional information.

Available Programs

The Adult Basic Education (ABE) is a program of instruction designed for adults who need to improve their reading, writing, speaking, problem-solving, or computation skills necessary to function effectively in society, on a job, or in the family.

Available ABE Courses:

ABE: Adult Basic Education

Adult Basic Education includes coursework designed to improve the employability of the state’s workforce through instruction in mathematics, reading, language, and workforce readiness skills. The program is designed to provide adults with sufficient basic education to enable them to benefit from job training and retraining programs and obtain productive employment.

ABE: Digital Applications

The Digital Application Skills class is designed to help adults gain digital literacy in the areas of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Google Docs, Email, and job searching.  Students can earn badges and certifications in these areas through NorthStar.

Students are required to take a Test of Adult Basic Education (TABE) Reading assessment through the Basic Skills Department. The TABE reading assessment is given to each student to determine ability level for appropriate placement.

This is a great class for adults who wish to gain the technology desired by today’s workforce. There is no fee associated with this course. For more information, call (252) 222-6195.

The Adult High School diploma program is a mutual agreement between the Carteret County Public School System and Carteret Community College to provide testing, guidance, and instruction to enable an adult student to complete the requirements for and be awarded an Adult High School diploma.

Persons 16 and 17 years of age can be enrolled with the permission of the superintendent of schools. The program consists of core courses required by the Department of Public Instruction along with an array of electives to select from. The number of credits (22 or 28) varies depending upon the specific affiliation agreement between the community college and the local public school system.

The summer semester Session I for Adult High School (AHS) begins May 23, 2022.

Please call the Basic Skills office at (252) 222-6195 for information regarding the Adult High School program.

Available AHS Courses:

AHS: English I

Students build and reinforce foundational reading, writing, and basic academic skills needed for success. Through carefully paced guided instruction students improve reading comprehension focusing on literacy development. Students practice and build skills in poetry, short stories and grammar. Instruction and practice in writing skills help students develop their composition skills and grammar competencies.

AHS: English II

Students build and reinforce foundational reading, writing, and basic language arts skills. Students develop mastery in reading comprehension, vocabulary building, study skills, grammar, and media literacy. Students gain skills in writing fundamentals by focusing on various types of composition.

AHS: English III

English III focuses on writing skills, beginning with a review of sentence structure and paragraph development and advancing to essays comprised of the four forms of discourse – expository, argumentative, descriptive and narrative. A brief overview of American literature highlights major literary movements and representative writers.

AHS: English IV

English IV refines writing skills, beginning with a review of sentence structure and the writing process. Emphasis is placed upon recognizing and eliminating common errors in writing and focusing on clarity and coherence while developing a personal style. A brief overview of British literature highlights major literary movements and representative writers.

AHS: Film Literature I

This course will be delivered using an extensive list of literature and film which deals with teens making the often rocky and uneven journey from childhood to adulthood. Movies and books about the rite of passage from childhood to adulthood have always been popular because people relate easily to the characters and their stories. Audiences love these tales of self-discovery, the loss of childhood innocence, and personal growth because they experience nostalgic and sentimental memories of their own youth. There will be extensive reading in class with expected out-of-class reading assigned. This reading will be used to develop an on-going written and oral conversation revolving around meaningful and significant aspects of the texts, stories and films students are studying. Evaluation will involve quizzes, tests, discussions, small group activities, projects and writing.

AHS: Economics & Personal Finance

This course will be provide students the opportunity to engage in intensive application of the skills, concepts, processes, and knowledge gained in previous social studies courses and prepare them to be college, career, and civic ready.

Because the study of economics and personal finance is an integral part of the learning progression of each course, kindergarten through high school, this course expects students to enter possessing a fundamental knowledge and understanding of the basic principles of economics and money management. When opportunities can be provided, this course can be augmented by related learning experiences, both in and out of school, that enable students to apply their knowledge and understanding of how to participate in their own financial literacy. Mastery of the standards and objectives of this course will inform and nurture responsible, participatory citizens who are competent and committed to responsible money management and financial literacy.

The standards for this course have been developed to serve as the framework which will guide each educational institution in the development of the curriculum for their standard and honors level courses for Economics and Personal Finance.

The standards of this course are conceptual in nature and have been organized around five strands:

  • Economics
  • Income & Education
  • Money & Credit Management
  • Financial Planning
  • Critical Consumerism

AHS: American History II

AHS: World History

The World History course will address six periods in the study of World History, with a key focus of study from the mid-15th century to present. The standards of this course are grouped in a way that reflects accepted periodization by historians. The learning standards of this course have been written to focus around a basic core of chronologically organized periods and events in history in order to have a set of learning standards that can be reasonable taught and learned with some depth and not just memorization of facts, within the time available for classroom instruction.

The desired outcome of this course is that students develop relevant enduring understandings of current world issues and relate them to their historical, political, economic, geographical and cultural contexts. As students examine the historical roots of significant events, ideas, movements, and phenomena, they encounter the contributions and patterns of civilizations of the past and societies around the world. Students taking this course will broaden their historical perspectives as they explore ways societies have dealt with continuity and change, exemplified by issues such as civilization, revolution, government, economics, war, stability, movement, technology, etc. This course is intended to be taught as a high school course that will receive high school credit. Thus, it has been developed based on the concepts, content and skills that are developmentally appropriate for students at the high school level.

AHS: Elective Lab I & II

Students will work through their select AHS electives on laptops in a classroom environment. Selected electives could include: personal finance, career explorations, sociology, and art appreciation.

A variety of AHS courses are offered in the AHS computer lab. The courses that are available in this lab include:

  • English I
  • English II
  • Government & Economics
  • World History I
  • World History II
  • U.S. History I
  • U.S. History II
  • Inner & Outer Space
  • Pre-Algebra
  • Algebra I
  • Geometry
  • Basic Math
  • Money Management
  • Earth Science
  • Physical Science
  • Geography
  • Biology
  • Human Body
  • Chemistry
  • World Wars
  • Social Psychology

Course work is provided by the self-paced A+ computer based software. The individual course contains a list of assignments that the student is required to complete before receiving credit for the course. In addition to the computer based training, individual instruction is provided by the instructor on an as needed basis.

English as a Second Language (ESL) is for students who are foreign born, and English is not their first language, with a focus on college and career readiness. Services are provided to English language learners who are adults, including professionals with degrees and credentials in their native countries, that enables such adults to achieve competency in the English language and acquire the basic and more advanced skills needed to function effectively as parents, workers, and citizens in the United States. These classes are designed to help the student learn to communicate in English. In addition to learning the basics of reading and writing the English language, students learn how to get help in emergency situations, how to shop for their families, how to deal with currency, learn to use a computer, and prepare for employment.

The High School Equivalency (HSE) program is designed for adults who have not completed high school. This program is designed to assist students to pass the four parts of the Official High School Equivalency exams.

These exams consist of:

  • Language Arts
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Mathematics

Students who pass the requirements for a High School Equivalency diploma are issued a diploma from the North Carolina State Board of Community Colleges. This diploma can be substituted in most places where a high school diploma is required.

Persons 16 and 17 years of age can be enrolled with the permission of the superintendent of schools. In order to become enrolled in the High School Equivalency program, students must attend an orientation prior to attending class(es). There is no cost for attending the orientation or HSE classes.

Available HSE Courses:

HSE: High School Equivalency Prep

This preparation class reviews math and language skills. The math skills that will be reviewed include basic math skills in the areas of addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, and percents. The language arts skills that will be reviewed include basic parts of speech, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. In the area of reading, the basic skills of comprehension and building vocabulary are stressed. The basic format in writing is practiced through various textbooks as well as personal experience stories written by the student. The students also learn how to utilize the five paragraph essay format for HSE.

HSE: High School Equivalency

This preparation course prepares students to take the GED (General Educational Development) tests. It is taught according to the individual needs and goals of the students. It is a flexible, self-paced class with the instructor guiding the students as they work through materials that will prepare them for the four GED Official Practice tests which are fore-runners for the official tests.

The official GED test areas include:

  • Language Arts (Reading and Writing)
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Math

The student must have a working knowledge of the subject matter in each area and learn strategies which will enable them to pass both of the required test batteries.

HSE: Math & Science

Classroom instruction in preparation for completing the HSE math and science tests. Content areas for math include: quantitative problem solving with rational numbers and measurement, and algebraic problem solving with expressions, equations, graphs, and functions.

Preparation for the science exam includes:

  • Life Science
  • Physical Science
  • Earth Science
  • Space Science

HSE: Language Arts & Social Studies

The General Education Development (GED) Language Arts and Social Studies course prepares the student to take the GED tests. It is taught according to the individual needs and goals of the students. It is a flexible, self-paced class with the instructor guiding the students as they work through materials that will prepare them for the four GED Official Practice tests which are fore-runners for the official tests.

The official GED test areas include:

  • Language Arts (Reading and Writing)
  • Social Studies
  • Science
  • Math

The student must have a working knowledge of the subject matter in each area and learn strategies which will enable them to pass both of the required test batteries.

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